Printmaking: You Don’t Just Press ‘Copy’

 

Vic Reeves, "Water Rail" (2006), in an edition of 50, £253, at the London Original Print Fair

Vic Reeves, "Water Rail" (2006), in an edition of 50, £253, at the London Original Print Fair

I love prints. They can get a bad rap, though, like they were made simply by pressing “copy” on a photocopier. Here’s a description of the process that is pretty good:

An artist does not make a print from an original painting. She conceives and executes it as an original piece. This generally involves one or more of the classic printmaking techniques like lithography (stone or plate), intaglio processes (i.e. etching, aquatint, engraving), relief printing like lino- and woodcut, screen-printing , digital manipulation (e.g. indigo printing). The artist cuts, draws, engraves, or otherwise creates the image. The intention is not to reproduce an original work but to create a new one.

Whereas…

When an original painting is copied it is called a reproduction and not an original print and is, basically, no more than a high quality poster. To make an original print takes an enormous amount of skill and time. Each print requires individual attention. Each coloor and tone requires manual input onto individual plates or screens.

This is just one cute chick. Or is it a quail. A seagull? (???!!!)

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